Coming in, Going out

Coming in
Becoming generally focused
Observing environment, thoughts and emotions instead of reacting.
“Meditation”
Focusing eyes on one place, while relaxing the muscles around the eyes, focusing on a sound in the environment, or on the movement of your breathing without controlling
Stillness comes naturally
Find the right balance of detachment and connectedness, the right balance between mind and heart, between feeling mechanistic or zombie like and feeling warm fuzzy loving detachment where the ordinary becomes revered, example: our interaction with life starts feeling like cuddling a pet
Everything feels more alive
Even breathing becomes enjoyable after a while of just following the breath. It becomes almost blissful. But to begin with it might feel boring because we are still too much identified with the mind.
At the inner most point we have detached emotionally from all ideas, even from the idea of being ourselves, of being a body: we become aware of our awareness.

Going out
Becoming more specifically focused
More emotionally attached to thoughts
Two directions: good feeling and not-good-feeling
Momentum builds and eventually we act

When feeling very negative, come in, become generally focused. This is easier than trying to change the negative thought or emotion into a positive one. This doesn’t mean we have to shut our eyes and meditate. Do it anywhere, anytime. From the place of general detached focus we can start building positive mental momentum easily. It is easier to hold the general emotional feeling of the direction you want to focus than to start with the thought first. The thought will develop out of the feeling.

When pondering ideas or solving problems we require the right balance of thinking, going out, and letting go, coming in. It is like a dance of thinking, then observing the ideas the mind presents, guiding them in a direction, letting go and observing, thinking again, and so on. This is why we sometimes get answers while doing something totally unrelated, because of our general focus.

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